Entrepreneur India Magazine featured JAAGRUTI Waste Paper Recycling Services, along with its Co-founders

Entrepreneur India Magazine featured JAAGRUTI Waste Paper Recycling Services, along with its Co-founders

This Photograph (*Image credit: Entrepreneur India) features, amongst others, the Co-founders of JAAGRUTI Waste Paper Recycling Services: Vasudha Mehta (Seated in the Center) and Vivek Mehta (with the stack of newspapers loaded over his arm). It was published in the August 2017 Issue of Entrepreneur India magazine in an article titled, “These Business Enthusiasts are Cash-in On the Trash“. The link to the complete article can be read by clicking here. 

Excerpts from the article quoting Vivek Mehta, Co-founder of JAAGRUTI Waste Paper Recycling Services are shared below:

Very few companies in India give you end-to-end waste management solution by collecting your waste, recycling it and give you finished goods.  Similar business model is followed by Jaagruti, a company that solely deals in paper recycling and management. Vivek Mehta, Co-founder of Jaagruti, says, “As an environment conscious individual, I hated paper wastage that happened rampantly at the office where I was working previously. So I thought why don’t I recycle paper and manufacture finished stationary to sell.” For Mehta, the idea was always to re-use, if that’s a possibility. “We took the waste paper to a mill where it would be recycled and then we again give it back to our client as a finished fresh paper product. That is how the loop closes,” said Vivek Mehta, Co-founder of Jaagruti.

‘One Green Planet’ website writes about JAAGRUTI and JAAGRUTI Waste Paper Recycling Services

Link to the Original post: http://www.onegreenplanet.org/news/stray-dog-organization-started-by-siblings/

Stray animals need all the help they can get – and every organization providing such care is not only incredibly precious but most often simply indispensable in the fight to make the lives of street animals better. One of such organizations is Jaagruti, a private trust from Delhi.

Jaagruti Trust was created by Vasudha Mehta, her brother Vivek, and mother Neeru in 2009. Their vision was to “inform, inspire, and share” – “Jaagruti” means “Awakening” in Hindi. The initial start of the project might have seemed like a small step, but, in fact, it was anything but that – now more than 2,000 street animals owe their lives to Jaagruti’s work!

The aim of the home-run trust is to provide onsite first-aid treatment for stray dogs suffering from injuries or maggot infections. To help the animals, Jaagruti works with a team of para-veterinary consultants and trained veterinary pharmacists.

The initial spark for starting the organization goes a long way back for Vasudha who, together with her family, used to look out for many stray dogs when she was younger. She recalls one special dog, Bhooru, who was with them for seven years and inspired all the more love for dogs in need. “I guess it all started there,” Vasudha told

“I guess it all started there,” Vasudha told The Better India, “right from the conscious feeling about the state of street animals.”

The siblings would often find that many strays were simply vanishing from the streets. The animals were being picked up for sterilization, but what was happening tot hem later remained unknown. Later, they found that the dogs were being dropped off at random locations, which resulted in further deaths. It was then that Vasudha and her brother began to take some of the dogs from their area into their own car for sterilization, after which they would take them back to the same place they had come from.

In 2004, Vasudha began to work with an animal welfare organization, learning more and more about stray animals’ lives. Then, in 2009, she and her brother began writing a blog publishing articles voicing concerns about municipality-driven sterilization and offering some basic first-aid measures for encountered animals in need. Soon, Vasudha found herself running a helpline where people could report cases. Finding that sterilization alone is not enough, they began giving dogs first-aid treatment.

Vasudha emphasizes how important her family is in what she is doing – she attributes her success to her mother for her support and her brother for always being a partner in good deeds.

Jaagruti’s work for stray animals is priceless – for so many of them, literally life-saving – but that is still not all that the organization is engaging in. In 2011, the siblings also started a venture involving paper recycling services. Since then, they have partnered with over 300 corporate and government organizations!

To learn more about Jaagruti and their fantastic work, visit www.we-recycle.org and click here for visiting the JAAGRUTI website to know more about their work for welfare of street animals

Image source: Jaagruti

‘The Better India” profiles both JAAGRUTI and JAAGRUTI Waste Paper Recycling Services

Both our works were featured on the popular positive news-portal named ‘The Better India‘ in a story titled, “A Family’s Commitment Has Helped Give Onsite Treatment to Over 2,000 Street Dogs in Delhi“.

Link to the original post is https://www.thebetterindia.com/105180/jaagruti-onsite-first-aid-treatment-for-dogs-delhi/

Story is shared below:

Sometimes the smallest step in the right direction ends up being the biggest step of your life.

Vasudha Mehta, an animal rights crusader, would definitely vouch for it.

The Delhi resident, along with her brother Vivek and mother Neeru, started the Jaagruti Trust in 2009 with a vision to “inform, inspire and share” just as the name ‘Jaagruti’ implies.

Together, they embarked upon a journey for the next eight years that would end up saving the lives of more than 2,000 street animals.

*Above photograph features Vasudha Mehta. Photo Courtesy: Kavita C Dixit/Book titled ‘Women of Wonder’, published by Vodafone Foundation and Roli Books.

With a team of para-veterinary consultants and trained veterinary pharmacists, the home-run trust provides onsite first-aid treatment for stray dogs with wounds from injuries or maggot infections.

“The reason for starting the trust goes a long way back. Back when we were young there used to be a lot of stray dogs in our locality that we looked out for. But there was one little boy whom we named Bhooru, who gave us seven wonderful years full of love and memories. I guess it all started there; right from the conscious feeling about the state of street animals,” Vasudha says.

Rewind back to 2002 when Bhooru was a part of the family, the brother-sister duo would often find many other strays just vanishing from their streets. Despite having inquired with municipal authorities they found no answers.

“It was disheartening. We knew that these dogs would often get picked up for sterilisation but then what happened to them? The thought continued to persist and it gave us no respite to be that clueless,” she adds.

In the meantime, the siblings took some of the dogs from their locality in their own car for sterilisation and made it a point of getting them back to the same place.

A dog being treated. Courtesy: Jaagruti.

After a while, they figured that the animals that were picked up for neutering were being dropped off at random locations after the deed, resulting in further deaths. “This would only agitate an animal after having been left at a hostile, unknown environment,” she says.

To understand how things worked, Vasudha, who had completed her masters, decided to work with animal welfare organisations in 2004. She learnt a lot about the plight of the animals, having seen both good and bad.

“My mother often told us that if you want to change something, you need to do it yourself, without having the need to depend on anyone else,” she says.

She recalls a time when she was unsure of her intentions to set up a trust or an organisation but discrepancies in the system and an overpowering concern did eventually pave the family’s destiny.


JAAGRUTI was also mentioned on the story on the below news-links:

 

 

 


“Finally in 2009, my brother and I began with a blog that published articles raising concerns of municipality driven sterilisation drives and offering basic DIY first-aid measures for stray animals and some of our rescue exploits,” Vasudha adds.

One thing lead to another and soon Jaagruti was running with a helpline where people in Delhi and the NCR zone could reach out and report cases.

“Initially, it was just the both of us in our car who took the dogs to the hospitals. Upon realising that this was not doing much good to them after being petrified in a surgical environment, we finalised on giving them first-aid treatment,” she says.

Apart from doing so much for their furry street friends, Vasudha and Vivek also started a venture in 2011 involving waste paper recycling services and have partnered with more than 300 corporate and government organisations.

“We work on a barter system model that involves buying the waste paper from huge establishments and paying them back with recycled and customised company specific notepads. We act as the link between these organisations and the paper mills,” Vasudha explains.

Vasudha attributes their success to her mother Neeru for her unbreakable support in the journey and her brother for being her partner in every good deed.

*Above photograph features Vivek Mehta

Vasudha and her family dedicate themselves to the well-being of voiceless beings, making the world a safer place for them.

Reach out to them for any query at contact@jaagruti.org and paper@we-recycle.org

To take advice on how to administer first aid and vaccinations for street dogs/street animals, anywhere across the Country, you can mail them at firstaid@jaagruti.org.

JAAGRUTI and JAAGRUTI Waste Paper Recycling Services were featured on “YourStory.com”

We were featured on the popular news-portal ‘YourStory.com’ in a story titled, “This family’s resolution has helped over 2,000 stray animals and recycled tonnes of waste paper“.

Link to the original post is https://yourstory.com/2017/05/jaagruti/

Story shared below:

 Vasudha, Vivek, and their mother Neeru Mehta been ‘awakening’ a sense of responsibility in people through their organisation Jaagruti.

We were featured on NewsX in a Panel discussion on Waste Management

Vasudha Mehta, Co-founder of JAAGRUTI Waste Paper Recycling Services was featured as an Expert on a Panel Discussion on “Waste Management woes plaguing all Indian Metros” on NewsX Channel.

She spoke on where exactly the Waste Management budget allotted to the Municipalities gets spent on, “its majorly spent on paying salaries to street sweepers, door to door garbage collection and hiring dumper trucks to dump the collected waste to landfill sites. There is no budget allocation on ‘Processing and Recycling of Waste’ at the Municipality or Government level”.

Our Work with Ramjas College, University of Delhi finds a mention in The Hindustan Times

We work with more than two dozen colleges in the University of Delhi and our work with Ramjas College located in the North Campus of University of Delhi found a mention in an article titled, “Eco friendly moves by Delhi University Colleges” in The Hindustan Times.

Excerpts from the article are quoted below:

From banning plastic bottles on campus, to recycling waste, installing solar heaters and promoting use of bicycles, Delhi University colleges are taking a number of eco-friendly initiatives to protect the environment.

 

Ramjas College has introduced a green cycle project to promote the use of bicycles within the campus and nearby areas.

“We have tied up with Delhi Cycles Private Limited (GreenRide Public Bicycle Sharing Service). We are the first college in Delhi University to do something like this. As a part of the project, Delhi Cycles will be providing cycles to us, free of cost. Two stands – On our campus and at the Metro – will be built. Students can swipe a smart card to access and drop off the cycles. Services will be available from 8 am to 8 pm, says Nalini Nigam, associate professor, department of botany in Ramjas.

From the past three years, the college has also been sending all its waste paper to Jaagruti waste paper recycling services. This year, waste paper sent totalled 2,230 kg, Nigam says.

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